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Pomeranian Dog Frequently Asked Questions.
   

AKC POMERANIAN FAQ's

General Information About Pomeranians and Frequently Asked Questions.

Q.

How big does a pomeranian get?

A.

The Pomeranian is small due to selective breeding, and weighs between 3 to 7 pounds. They look like a tiny fox.

Q.

What is a pomeranians temperament like?

A.

Pomeranians have an outgoing, bouncy personality with a "big dog" attitude. They are intelligent and eager to please.

Q.

I live in an apartment. Do pomeranians make good city dogs?

A.

They do well in an apartment or small environments, with other small breeds, and even cats. Although, they do tend to become more vocal when there is more than one present.

Q.

How much grooming is required?

A.

Pomeranians have a double coat, composed of a soft undercoat with stiff stand off guard hairs, typical of dogs that originated in cold climates. They require very little grooming, except to use a wire pin brush once a week to brush out any tangles. Bathe when they get oily or dirty, otherwise every couple of months.

Q.

What is the average life span of a pomeranian?

A.

Pomeranians are a healthy, hardy breed that often lives to be 15 to 16 years old, with proper care and good diet. Their teeth must be cleaned regularly to prevent gingivitis and tooth loss at a early age. Weekly cleaning with a small child’s tooth brush will help maintain clean teeth between veterinary checkups.

Q.

Are pomeranians a good choice if I have small children?

A.

Because the pomeranian is a small dog and could be accidentally injured, they are not generally recommended as a pet if you have small children. Injuries can occur from falls, jumping off furniture, being stepped on, etc. Larger pomeranians in the 15 to 20 lbs group would be a better choice if you have small children.

Q.

What health issues are common in pomeranians?

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Patellar luxation is quite common in toy breeds, and the Pomeranian is no exception. This is a disorder of the kneecap in which the knee will slip out of place when the dog moves. There are varying degrees of this disorder, with the most severe requiring surgery.

Tracheal collapse is a disorder of the windpipe. When weakened, it will collapse resulting in persistent coughing and difficult breathing. Your veterinarian can recommend medication for this problem.

In whelping puppies, c-sections are commonly required with Pomeranians. Since the breed has been bred down from larger dogs, it has difficulty in free whelping.

Open fontanels are an opening in the top of the skull, much like what we see in a new born infants, and are not uncommon in the breed. Fortunately, most of the smaller ones seen in puppies will close when they are adults.

Entropion is an eye problem where the eyelid rolls inward. The lashes on the edge of the eyelid irritate the surface of the eyeball. Entropian can lead to more serious problems, including blindness. Surgery can correct this most of the time.

Cryptorchidism is a condition in male dogs where one or both testicles do not descend into the scrotum. Sometimes puppies will have both testicles descend by the time they are 6 months old.

Overshot/undershot bites are where the teeth do not line up properly in a scissor bite. This is caused by either the upper or bottom jaw growing longer than the other. This is not the same as teeth being out of line, which can occur when retained puppy teeth are not removed. Click here to read my article on removing retained puppy teeth.

Low thyroid is common in the Pomeranian. Have your veterinarian check for it with a blood test.

Black Skin Disease is a known problem in the Pomeranian and can affect both sexes, but more often shows up in the male. Puppies with cotton or sheeps wool textured coats are more prone to this condition than puppies with normal coats that have the long guard hairs. Currently there is still a lot of research being done on this disease and how to treat it.

Hypoglycemia is very common in the small toy breeds. Click here to read my article on how to deal with hypoglycemia.